Theresa May is facing a constitutional crisis after six opposition parties joined forces to accuse the government of contempt of Parliament over its failure to publish its full Brexit legal advice.

The Commons Speaker, John Bercow, said there was "an arguable case" that the government had committed contempt, after he was asked by Labour, the SNP, the Liberal Democrats, Plaid Cymru, the Green Party and the DUP to begin proceedings.

Earlier, Attorney general Geoffrey Cox admitted the UK could be locked into a customs backstop under the prime minister’s Brexit blueprint.

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Mr Cox confirmed that neither the UK nor EU would be able to unilaterally end the Northern Irish backstop arrangement if it came into force, in an address to MPs.

It also comes as The Independent’s petition calling for a Final Say referendum on Brexit was delivered to Downing Street, after more than a million people backed the campaign.

See below for live updates:

Good morning and welcome to The Independent's politics liveblog as the we prepare to deliver the petition calling for a final say on the Brexit deal.
Editor Christian Broughton will be delivering one million Final Say signatures and People’s Vote spokesman Chuka Umunna MP will be delivering 300,000 People’s Vote signatures to Downing Street at midday.
 
Campaigners will be gathering outside the Churchill War Rooms from 11am before setting off for the prime minister's residence at 11.30am.

Join us as we deliver this petition to 10 Downing Street

On Monday we will be heading to 10 Downing Street to deliver our petition calling for a Final Say on Brexit.
Well over a million of you have signed up, adding your names to our call for a full, public vote on the most important political question for a generation. It is time to make clear to the prime minister that the people want and need to be part of the Brexit process. One snapshot was not enough. Every signature counts so please continue to share the petition among your friends and family.
Only by giving people a Final Say on Brexit can we know with confidence how the country feels about our relationship with the EU.
Thank you for backing our call already. If you would like to show your support for our petition in person, meet us at the Churchill War Rooms near Parliament Square (at the bottom of the steps) at 10.30am on Monday 3rd December. And please share this petition – everyone should get the chance to back it.
 
Lib Dem leader Sir Vince Cable, former Green Party leader Caroline Lucas and former education minister Justine Greening are also due to take part.
 
The campaign has been backed by former PM Tony Blair, former Conservative attorney general Dominic Grieve, campaigner Gina Miller and ex-Labour spin doctor Alastair Campbell.
Sam Gyimah MP also urged Theresa May not to rule out calls for a Final Say referendum after resigning from his cabinet post as universities minister.
 

Tory MP says fresh Brexit referendum could be 'most sensible path' as he quits government

On the negotiations, the former universities minister said: ‘It is like playing a football game against another team when they are the referee and they can make the rules as they go along’
Later today attorney general Geoffrey Cox is due to make a statement in parliament about his legal advice on the EU withdrawal agreement.
 
Theresa May is facing calls to make the opinion public. Labour said it is ready to combine with other opposition parties to start proceedings for contempt of parliament unless the report is published in full. Boris Johnson has described the prime minister's refusal to do so a "scandal".
 

Johnson joins opposition parties in demanding legal advice published over May's 'appalling' Brexit deal

Attorney general reportedly warns UK faces being tied to EU customs union 'indefinitely' through Irish backstop proposal
Theresa May's top Brexit adviser has privately warned her that a key element of her exit blueprint would be a "bad outcome" for the UK.
 
Oliver Robbins, who led the behind-the-scenes talks with Brussels, reportedly told the prime minister that there was no legal guarantee that Britain could withdraw from the "backstop", which aims to prevent a hard border in Ireland if future trade talks fail.
 

'No legal guarantee' Britain could withdraw from Irish backstop, top Brexit adviser warns May

The comments will intensify demands for minister to publish full legal advice on the Brexit deal
Businessman Sir Ian Wood has said Theresa May's Brexit deal is "workable" and is better than the current situation with Europe.
 
He told BBC Good Morning Scotland that the UK cannot afford to leave without a deal and that the plan now needs to "move ahead."
 
"There is not a solution which anyone, or I suspect even more than 50% of people, would really say 'that's a really good solution,'" he added.
 
Sir Ian, who made his fortune in the North Sea oil industry, also claimed that Brexit "will see significantly more fish coming to the Scottish fishing fleet."
Home secretary Sajid Javid has said that MPs are "very unlikely" to see plans for the UK's future immigration system before they vote on the Brexit deal.
 
Explaining the delay, the Home Secretary told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "This is the biggest change in our immigration system in over four decades - the most significant change we're going to see in immigration as we take control of our immigration system, so it's important that we work on the details, that we listen to people, to businesses and others and we get the details right."
 
Mr Javid and chancellor Philip Hammond are reported to be pressing for the government to abandon the target of reducing net migration below 100,000 a year.
Brexit uncertainty contributed to the "lacklustre" performance of the UK manufacturing industry in November, according to the latest survey of the sector.
 

UK manufacturing 'lacklustre' in November as Brexit uncertainty continues to bite

The Purchasing Managers’ Index in the month showed a weakening of export orders and optimism among firms slumped to a 27-month low
As parliament builds up to the vote on the EU withdrawal agreement on 11 December, Labour's shadow Brexit secretary has said it is inevitable that they will table a motion of no confidence in the government if the deal is voted down in the Commons.
 

Labour will table no confidence motion in Theresa May’s government if Brexit deal voted down in Commons

'It seems to me if the prime minister has a lost a vote of that significance, then there has to be a motion of confidence in the government’
Leading Brexiteer Michael Gove has also been forced to admit a second referendum is now a real possibility.
 

Michael Gove admits there could be another Brexit referendum

The environment secretary urged colleagues to get behind Theresa May’s deal while acknowledging it was ‘imperfect’
Two Conservative MPs have backed calls for publication of the attorney general's legal opinion on the EU withdrawal agreement.
 
Simon Clarke MP and David Jones MP - both lawyers - pointed out that, although the advice is usually not divulged, there was a precedent for doing so in the advice of Lord Goldsmith to Tony Blair on the legality of the Iraq war.
 
Simon Clarke MP said: "We are about to embark on the most significant debate in parliament for many decades. The functioning of the backstop and our ability to ever leave it will lie at the heart of it, and the advice the attorney general has laid before the cabinet is crucial. There should not be two classes of MPs in this debate - those who are aware of the full ramifications and those who aren’t. The government accepted the will of the House that this advice would indeed be published. It would be an act of bad faith not to do so now - and one that would strengthen people’s suspicions that ministers refuse to do so for fear of how damning it is."
 
The Rt Hon David Jones MP said: "At this crucial moment in the Brexit process, it is essential that parliament should be as fully informed as possible on the legal issues surrounding the deal. These include, among others, the role of the European Court of Justice, the justiciability of the “best endeavours” provision and whether it is possible to withdraw from the backstop without the consent of the EU.  I am sure that Geoffrey Cox has given sensible, dispassionate advice and the government is under a duty to ensure that the Commons sees it."
A reminder that if you want to show your support for a public vote on the Brexit deal, the Final Say and People's Vote campaigns are delivering their respective petitions to Theresa May at midday.
 
Meet outside the Churchill War Rooms near Parliament Square (at the bottom of the steps) from 10.30am onwards before the group heads towards Downing Street at 11.30am.
Here's Alastair Campbell on a Final Say vote.
 
"Yes, it will be divisive and difficult. There are no easy ways out of this mess. But the people who gave the government the task of negotiating Brexit should have the Final Say on whether this is what they meant, and whether it’s what they want. If not, they should be entitled to say that we should stay, especially now we know for a fact, courtesy of the government itself, that all versions of Brexit leave us worse off."
 

'Theresa May has dismissed the will of the people even with over 1m Final Say signatures – don’t let her'

The only unity Theresa May has delivered is between Leavers and Remainers, united in seeing her plan as a rotten deal
Right now Theresa May is appearing on ITV's This Morning to talk about her "Brexit vision".
 
"This will determine our future," she tells Phillip Schofield. "The overwhelming message I am getting from people is that people just want us to get on with it."
Asked what will happen if her deal is voted down by MPs, she sidesteps the question and says she is focused on getting it through parliament.
 
"People are talking about a second vote when we haven't even delivered the first vote," she says.
Ms May effectively agrees that there will be no second vote during her premiership.
 
She is again asked if she will resign if MPs vote against the deal, and again does not give a direct answer.
 
"What I believe to be right at the moment is it is in our interests to get this deal through and move on to the future," says the prime minister.
The prime minister says she is keen to have a "head-to-head" TV debate with Jeremy Corbyn on Sunday evening.
 
She seems to suggest that the wrangling over whether the debate is on ITV or the BBC is based upon whether they miss I'm a Celebrity or Strictly Come Dancing. Ms May is the Strictly fan.
Perhaps the most significant line from Theresa May is her apparent confidence she will still be prime minister after the Brexit vote on 11 December.
 
"I will still have my job in two weeks time," she tells ITV's This Morning.
 
But does that mean she will not resign if her deal is defeated - or that she is confident the deal will pass?
Here's the part where Theresa May says she will still have her job in two weeks time.
 
 
Phillip Schofield: "Will you be booking a holiday? Do you think you will still have a job in two weeks' time?"
 
Ms May laughs and replies: "I will still have a job in two weeks' time. My job is making sure we do what the public asked us to, we leave the EU but we do it in a way that is good for them."

 

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